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Glass Splashbacks | Kitchen Splashbacks | Bathroom Splashbacks | Glass Balustrades | Potton, Bedfordshire

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

The historic town of Potton

The town of Potton is situated in Bedfordshire. It is 10 miles from Bedford and the population in 2001 was 4,473 people. In 1783 the Great Fire of Potton destroyed a large part of the town. The parish church dates from the 13th Century and is dedicated to St Mary. The Potton horse fairs were some of the largest in the country.

The village's name was spelled Pottun in 960 AD and Potone in the 1086 Domesday book. It is derived from the Old English for "farmstead where pots are made". Sourcing local clay was a major industry at one point, and much was needed to satisfy all the potters working in the area.

Iron age times in Potton

Evidence of early-middle Iron Age settlements in the form of ditches, a pit and shards of pottery were found in 2009 by archaeologists at Vicarage Farm in Potton. The parish of Potton underwent parliamentary enclosure twice, once in 1775, and again in 1832.

Enclosure, sometimes recorded as Inclosure, is a term, used in English landownership, that refers to the appropriation of waste or common land enclosing it and by doing so depriving commoners of their rights of access and privilege. Agreements to enclose land could be either through a formal or informal process. The process could normally be accomplished in three ways. First there was the creation of closes, taken out of larger common fields by their owners. Secondly, there was enclosure by proprietors, these were owners who acted together, usually small farmers or squires, leading to the enclosure of entire parishes. Finally there were enclosures by Acts of Parliament, these had the greatest force of law and would have hit the poorer Potton residents very hard indeed.

The primary reason for enclosure was to improve the efficiency of agriculture. However, there were other motives too, one example being that the value of the land enclosed would be substantially increased. There were social consequences to the policy, with many protests at the removal of rights from the common people. Enclosure riots are seen by historians as the pre-eminent form of social protest from the 1530s to 1640s.

Great Fire of Potton

The Great Fire of Potton started in a stack of clover in a field in the area of what is now Spencer Close, in 1783. King Street, half the Market Square and some of the Brook End area of Potton were completely destroyed. It was reported to have burned for at least a day. Residents of Potton and further afield managed to raise £6,000 to help those who had lost so much in the fire. Although £6,000 may not seem much money, the equivalent today would be £963,899.40, so quite a sizeable amount of money. The 13th-century parish church, St Mary's, survived. Rebuilding after the fire has left the town with a number of Georgian buildings.

Potton markets and fairs

King William II granted Potton a market in 1094. The Potton market was one of the largest in the county of Bedfordshire during the Tudor and Stuart periods, but sadly declined after the Great Fire. Corn and straw plait were the principal goods manufactured and sold on Potton market in 1831.

A fair was granted by Henry II in 1227. As of 1831, fairs were held in January, April, July and October. The Potton horse fairs were some of the largest in the country and were a major fixture in the equine world, until they ended in 1932.

The Shambles provided folding market stalls in Potton town square before brick buildings were put in place by Samuel Whitbread, the Lord of the Manor, in 1797. They became dilapidated in the 1930s and were demolished after the Second World War, with a modern library built in their place. The Clock House was opened on 23 July 1956 and used The Shambles' clock, illuminated dials and bell. In spring 2006, the mechanism was replaced with an automatic winding system costing £3,000.

A nod to Potton Lord with local school

The Samuel Whitbread Academy is a secondary school named after the Potton Lord. The popular local school is situated a mere twenty minutes from Potton and serves a wide area of Bedfordshire.

Even the Potton railway has an historical background

The Sandy and Potton Railway, also known as Captain Peel's Railway, after Sir Robert Peels third son who was awarded the Victoria Cross, opened on 9 November 1857. It was established by Captain Sir William Peel VC, who resided at The Lodge. When the Great Northern Railway came to Sandy in 1850, Captain Peel had a branch line built to his estate and on to Potton. The railway's locomotive was named Shannon, after the frigate Captain Peel was commanding. He never saw his railway; he died of smallpox in April 1858 in India. The engine itself is in the collection of the National Railway Museum and is currently housed at Didcot Railway Centre. The Potton Barbershop Harmony Club named its male chorus 'Shannon Express' after the historic locomotive.

Potton railway station, which opened in 1862 and served the Varsity Line between Oxford to Cambridge, was closed in 1968. The railway was partly to blame for the rapid decline of the popular Potton market but made London far more accessible for the local market gardeners.

Potton Manor becomes a wartime laboratory

Potton Manor was built in the 1860s. Like so many manors and stately homes, Potton Manor was requisitioned by the armed forces and used as a laboratory during the war and as a car factory by Eva Pokorova and Otto van Smekal. The Champion car built in Potton was purchased from the National Motor Museum by the Potton History Society, whose aim was to restore the vehicle to full working order. Sadly Potton Manor was eventually demolished in the early 1980s.

How many manors did Potton have?

Potton has a rich history and in 1237 Potton was split by inheritance into four manors: Potton Rectoria, Potton Burdetts, Potton Regis and Potton Much Manured. These four manors were finally recombined by the Burgoyne family between 1544 and 1637 by progressive purchase.

The prosperity of Potton as a market town is reflected in its oldest houses on the south side of the Market Square and in Sun Street. These properties have timber frames which may have originated in late medieval or even early Tudor times.

First Land Settlement Association in Potton

In March 1935 the first Land Settlement Association estate of thirty smallholdings was established to the east of Potton along the Wrestlingworth, Sutton and Hatley Roads with land being donated by Sir Malcolm Stewart, who was last Lord of Potton Manor. The main purpose of the association was to resettle unemployed men from defunct coal mining towns in the north of England. Pig and poultry farming plus horticulture were the main activities in Potton at this time, often augmented by a central farm. Potton provided the model for a further twenty such estates across the country.

Tragedy strikes Potton with an air crash

On 18 September 1945, a B-24 Liberator bomber crashed on the southern edge of Potton Wood. Four men were killed; the place where it fell can still be seen to this day.

A new mirror for your Potton home

Sometimes one simply cannot find the right type of mirror in the shops and needs to look to a company that can make one to the exact specifications of the client. Splashbacks of Distinction are such a company! We can manufacture bespoke mirrors for our clients, just the way they want them. Some mirrors are destined to be framed and others look fantastic without, we cater for both.

So no matter what size, shape or type of mirror you require, Splashbacks of Distinction can deliver the goods on time and at a very reasonable price.

Splashbacks of Distinction are available to visit your Potton home to measure up and fit a quality glass splashback or one of our other toughened glass products. Glass is such a clean and modern medium for your home and you'd be surprised just how much glass can transform your home.

Splashbacks of Distinction supply the following:

  • Kitchen splashbacks
  • Glass bathroom splashbacks
  • Glass balustrades
  • Glass shelves
  • Bespoke mirrors
  • Bespoke shower screens and enclosures
  • Acrylic splashbacks
  • Glass worktops

So if you live in Potton and would like Splashbacks of Distinction to provide you with a high quality glass splashback or any other glass product in our range, why not give us a call or fill in our contact form. We are a family run business and have a long list of very satisfied customers. Why not check out our projects gallery page to see some of our work.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01920 830 084, email us at enquiries@splashbacksofdistinction.co.uk or fill in our enquiry form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Areas covered in Bedfordshire:

Showroom: Unit 11, Broomhall Farm, Watton At Stone, Hertford SG14 2RN

t: 01920 830 084

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