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Glass Splashbacks | Kitchen Splashbacks | Bathroom Splashbacks | Glass Balustrades | Wolverton, Buckinghamshire

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Wolverton is a constituent town of Milton Keynes. It is at its northern edge, between Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnell. It is the administrative seat of Wolverton and Greenleys civil parish.

Recorded in Domesday, Wolverton suffered badly in the Enclosures, before reinventing itself as a railway town in the industrial revolution. Today, Wolverton is a thriving focus for the northern edge of Milton Keynes.

Some Wolverton history

The Wolverton name is an Old English language word, and means 'Wulfhere's settlement'. It was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Wluerintone. The original Wolverton was a medieval settlement just north and west of modern day town. This site is now known as Old Wolverton, although the medieval village is all but gone. The ridge and furrow pattern of past agriculture practices can still be seen in the nearby fields that surround the village.

The Saxon Church of the Holy Trinity was rebuilt in 1819 and still sits next to the Norman Motte and Bailey site. Sadly, only the earth mound remains of the Norman castle, though the Saxon tower still stands as central to the rebuilt church, clad in the early 19th century in traditional Anglo-Norman style. Next door to the church is a house built in 1729 which later became the vicarage; the front door has stonework from the nearby, demolished manor house of the 16th century including the de Longueville family coat of arms, and pieces from the earlier church building.

Wolverton and the ancient Talbot dog

A Talbot dog, another symbol of the family, once graced the side-entrance which now marks the boundary between the ground floor of the house and its downstairs toilet. The Talbot was a type of hunting hound common in England during the middle ages. It is depicted in art of the period as small to medium-sized, white in colour, with short legs, large powerful feet, and a deep chest with a slender waist, long drooping ears, and a very long curled tail. It is shown in one well-known example at Haddon Hall with a fierce facial expression. It is now extinct, but is believed to be an ancestor of the modern Beagle and Bloodhound. It is uncertain whether it was a scent hound, bred for the quality of its nose, or a sight hound, that was bred for the quality of sight and speed, or a dog used for digging out quarry, nor is it known what type of quarry it hunted, although it was probably deer, fox and boar.

Wolverton Manor

The manor of Wolverton was held by the de Wolverton family until the middle of the fourteenth century. Sir John de Wolverton died in 1349 leaving an infant son, Ralph, who died in 1351, and two daughters. The elder daughter Margaret or Margery, married John le Hunt, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, and had in turn one daughter, Joan le Hunt, who married John Longueville of Billing, Northamptonshire. They had at least one son, George, through whom Wolverton passed by inheritance to the Longueville family.

A clue to the agricultural history of Wolverton

Wolverton village itself gives away a clue as to its farming heritage. Today, only field patterns marking a deserted village remain, along with two village ponds. The desertion of Old Wolverton was due to enclosure of the large strip cultivation fields into small "closes" by the local landlords, the Longville family, who turned arable land over to pasture.

By 1654, the family had completely enclosed the parish of Wolverton. With the end of the feudal system, the peasants had lost their land and grazing rights and were forced to find other work or be plunged into absolute poverty. Thus Old Wolverton was reduced from about thirty poor peasant families in the mid 16th century to almost none, within the space of one hundred years.

Wolverton and the Grand Union Canal

The Grand Union Canal passes around the northern and eastern edge of modern day Wolverton. The canal originally crossed the River Great Ouse by descending ten metres to the river by nine locks, crossing the river on the level and ascended by eight locks on the other side. This took a great deal of time for navigators and was also subject to a great deal of disruption should there be a case of flooding.

Wolverton carriage works

In 1838, Wolverton was established as the site of the locomotive repair shop at the midpoint of the London and Birmingham Railway then under construction. In 1846 the L & B became part of the London and North Western Railway, who subsequently decided that locomotives would be built and repaired at Crewe. The last locomotives at Wolverton were built in 1863 and repaired until 1877, after which it concentrated on carriages including railway owned road vehicles. The Works has been the home of the Royal Train fleet. During the Second World War, the Works built parts for the legendary Lee-Enfield rifles, bomber plane timber frames, Hawker Typhoon wings, Horsa Gliders, and ambulances. Wolverton certainly played a major part in the war effort. Such was the importance of the war time industry in Wolverton; camouflage paint from the time can still be seen on many of the factory buildings, to help protect them from aerial bombardment by the enemy. A pillbox remains opposite the Works Wall. These defensive structures were first used on the Western Front during the WW1.

The railway company built about two hundred houses for its workers by 1844 along with schools, a church and a market. L&NW also invited George McCorquodale to establish what became a substantial printing works in Wolverton.

A listed church for Wolverton

An Anglican parish church was built in 1843 to serve the new Wolverton town centre. With the Church of the Holy Trinity in Old Wolverton, listed building status has been conferred to both historic churches.

Wolverton has the oldest covered football stand in the world

The football ground beside the railway works and the station was home to the works team and subsequently to Wolverton Town football club. The stand, built in 1899, is considered to be the oldest covered football stand in the world. Sadly, the original stand was set to be demolished in 2006 because its owners wanted to redevelop the site for housing and a community park. The development did go ahead and a replica stand was erected on the original site to mark the significance of the old stand. The aesthetics have remained the same as the original, down to the green paint that adorned the historic stand.

If you live in Wolverton and would like Splashbacks of Distinction to give you a free, no obligation quote for a quality toughened glass splashback; why not get in touch today. We are always able to offer the very best advice and if you are unsure about what would look good in your home, we can help to guide you through the entire process.

Changing your old ceramic tiles to a toughened glass splashback is the best decision you could possibly make. Glass is a stunning and modern addition to any home that allows the light to shine through. Glass is also supremely easy to care for too. With no visible joins, a quick wipe and there is no grease, grime or cleaning residue left behind.

Splashbacks of Distinction are available to visit your Wolverton home to measure up and fit a quality glass splashback or one of our other toughened glass products. Glass is such a clean and modern medium for your home and you'd be surprised just how much glass can transform your home.

Splashbacks of Distinction supply the following splashback products in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire

  • Glass kitchen splashbacks
  • Glass kitchen splashback samples
  • Glass kitchen splashbacks in many different colours
  • Printed glass splashbacks
  • Colour matched splashbacks
  • Painted splashbacks

Splashbacks of Distinction also supply the following glass products in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire

  • Stainless steel and glass Balustrades
  • Glass shelves
  • Coloured mirrors
  • Toughened mirrors
  • Decorative glass
  • Glass hardware
  • Glass worktops
  • Glass shower cubicle
  • Garden glass balustrades
  • Glass staircases
  • Glass table tops
  • Satin glass
  • Toughened glass
  • Laminated glass
  • Opaque glass

Splashbacks of Distinction also supply the following glass related services in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire

  • Glass cut to size
  • Mirrors cut to size while you wait
  • Glass processing
  • Glass supply and installation
  • Supply only splashbacks
  • A glass express service
  • Template and fit

Only the finest quality from Splashbacks of Distinction

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01920 830 084, email us at enquiries@splashbacksofdistinction.co.uk or fill in our enquiry form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Areas covered in Buckinghamshire:

Showroom: Unit 11, Broomhall Farm, Watton At Stone, Hertford SG14 2RN

t: 01920 830 084

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