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Kitchen splashback dulux tarragon from splashbacks of distinction
Bespoke glass shower from splashbacks of distinction
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Patterned kitchen glass splashbacks from splashbacks of distinction
External glass fencing around patio from splashbacks of distinction
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Glass Splashbacks | Kitchen Splashbacks | Bathroom Splashbacks | Glass Balustrades | Canvey Island, Essex

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Canvey Island is a civil parish and reclaimed island in the Thames estuary. It is separated from the mainland of south Essex by a network of creeks. Lying only just above sea level it is prone to flooding at exceptional tides, but has nevertheless been inhabited since the Roman invasion of Britain.

The island was mainly agricultural land until the 20th century when it became the fastest growing seaside resort in Britain between 1911 and 1951. The North Sea flood of 1953 devastated the island costing the lives of 58 islanders, and led to the temporary evacuation of the 13,000 residents. Canvey is consequently protected by modern sea defences comprising 2 miles of concrete sea walls.

Canvey is also notable for its relationship to the petrochemical industry. The island was the site of the first delivery in the world of liquefied natural gas by container ship, and later became the subject of an influential assessment on the risks to a population living within the vicinity of petrochemical shipping and storage facilities.

Some Canvey Island history

Excavations on Canvey have unearthed a large collection of early man made objects such as axes from the Neolithic era, a bracelet dating from the Bronze Age, and Iron Age pottery. However, the remains of Roman structures and objects suggests the first settlement of Canvey occurred between AD 50 and 250. The remains point to a community existing with a farmstead, a garrison, a burial ground, and the operation of a large salt making industry was revealed by the existence of several red hills.

The discovery of a Roman road found to terminate 109 yards across the creek in neighbouring Benfleet suggests a means may have existed to facilitate the salts distribution to Chelmsford and Colchester, and the recovery of rich items of pottery and glassware of a variety only matched elsewhere by excavations of port facilities suggests the Romans may also have exploited the Canvey Island location in the Thames for shipping.

Canvey Island events

In 1607 the Elizabethan antiquarian William Camden noted in his work Britannia: a topographical and historical survey of all of Great Britain and Ireland, that Canvey Island was documented in the 2nd century by the Alexandrian geographer Ptolemy. In his work Geographia, Ptolemy mentions a headland in the mouth of the Thames to the east of the Trinovantes region called Counus Island. However, the difficulties faced in determining the location of land areas in Ptolemys ancient work have led modern researchers to question the correlation between Ptolemys island and contemporary Canvey Island. 18th century historians believe that Counus Island would have existed much further out to sea, or could have even been the Isle of Sheppey, so any similarity between the names is mere coincidence. Without any suitable island matching Ptolemys Counus Island, modern day historians think the documented island to have been lost or reduced to an insignificant sandbank by subsidence and the constant effects of the sea.

Saxon and medieval Canvey Island

The settlement and agricultural development of Essex by the Saxons from the 5th century saw the introduction of sheep farming, which would dominate the Canvey Islands industry until the 20th century. After the Norman conquest the area of Canvey Island was recorded in the Domesday Book as a sheep farming pasture under the control of nine parishes across south inland and coastal Essex; some of these parishes were on the adjacent mainland, but others were as far afield as Laindon and Prittlewell. Apart from the meat and wool produced from the sheep, the milk from the ewes was used for cheese-making. The abundance in later centuries would see the cheeses become a commodity taken for sale at the London markets, and at one stage exported via Calais to the continent.

The existence of several place names on modern Canvey Island using the wick suffix shows the influence of the early Saxon culture. The wick makes reference to the sheds in which the cheese was made.

It is believed that the name of Canvey Island is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Caningaege, meaning the Island of Canas People. Developments in the English language yielded the more familiar form Caneveye found in manorial records of 1254. The period of transition from Old to Early Middle English often give rise to confusions of orthography, leading, in this instance, to such variant spellings as Canefe, Kaneweye, Kaneveye and Koneveye. By the 12th century, Essex and subsequently Canvey Island were in the possession of Henry de Essex who inherited the land from his grandfather, Swein, son of Robert fitz Wymarch.

During the reign of Henry II, the land was confiscated from de Essex and redistributed among the Kings most favoured and loyal nobles.

14th century - 17th century Canvey Island

One of two octagonal Dutch cottages from the 17th century which are preserved on Canvey Island.

During Edward IIs reign the land was under the possession of John de Apeton and the first attempts were made at managing the effects of the sea with some basic defences, but periodical flooding continued to impact the population of mostly shepherds and their fat tailed variety of sheep for a further three hundred or so years. William Camden wrote of Canvey Island in 1607 that it was so low that it was often quite flooded, except the hills, upon which the sheep had a place of safe refuge. The uniform flatness of Canvey suggests that these hills are likely to be the red hills of the Roman saltmaking industry, or the early makeshift sea defences constructed by some of the early landowners around their farms.

In 1622, Sir Henry Appleton and Canvey Islands other landowners started a project to reclaim the land and wall the island to protect it from the River Thames. An agreement reached in 1623 stipulated that in return for inning and recovering the island, the landowners would grant a third of the land as payment for the work.

A broad drainage ditch was dug inland off the area facing the river while smaller inlets were filled in. Excess water would have collected in the broad ditch and then been discharged into the river by the means of seven sluices. The completion of the work saw a considerable number of the Dutch engineers take land as payment for their work, and consequently settle on Canvey Island. Approximately one third of Canvey Island streets have names of Dutch origin.

Splashbacks of Distinction are manufacturers and fitters of the highest quality toughened glass splashbacks and we are ready and waiting for your call. We are yet to fit a glass splashback in Canvey Island, but we're pretty sure it won't be long before someone there realises what a superb product it is and gives us a call. Nothing looks cleaner or more modern than a glass splashback, particularly when some tasteful under cupboard lighting is fitted to compliment the look.

Splashbacks of Distinction supply the following in Canvey Island:

  • Coloured or patterned kitchen splashbacks
  • Coloured or patterned glass bathroom splashbacks
  • Toughened glass balustrades
  • Toughened glass shelves
  • Custom made mirrors
  • Bespoke shower screens and enclosures
  • Kitchen splashbacks with a high resolution image
  • Glass bathroom splashbacks, also with or without high resolution images
  • Toughened glass Juliet balconies

So if you live in Canvey Island and would like Splashbacks of Distinction to provide you with a high quality glass splashback or any other glass product in our range, why not give us a call or fill in our contact form. We are a family run business and have a long list of very satisfied customers. Why not check out our projects gallery page to see some of our work.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your Canvey Island property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01920 830 084, email us at enquiries@splashbacksofdistinction.co.uk or fill in our enquiry form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Areas covered in Essex:

Showroom: Unit 11, Broomhall Farm, Watton At Stone, Hertford SG14 2RN

t: 01920 830 084

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