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Kitchen splashback dulux tarragon from splashbacks of distinction
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Glass Splashbacks | Kitchen Splashbacks | Bathroom Splashbacks | Glass Balustrades | Colchester, Essex

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Colchester is a very historic town and the largest settlement within the borough of Colchester in Essex.

At the time of the census in 2001, Colchester had a population of 104,390, marking a considerable rise from the previous census and with considerable development since 2001 and ongoing building plans; it has been named as one of Britains fastest growing towns. As the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, Colchester is claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. It was for a time the capital of Roman Britain, and is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network.

Colchester is 51.2 miles northeast of London and is connected to the capital by the A12 road and the Great Eastern Main Line. It is seen as a popular town for commuters, and is less than 30 miles away from Stansted Airport.

Colchester is home to Colchester Castle and Colchester United Football Club. Colchester has a Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament.

Colchester history: Rich and diverse

Owing to the age of Colchester, it is hardly surprising that the town has such a wealth of history. If times past is of interest to you, Colchester is the place to visit to satisfy your thirst for historical facts about the oldest town in Britain.

Colchester prehistory

The gravel hill upon which Colchester is built was formed in the Middle Pleistocene period, and was shaped into a terrace between the Anglian glaciation and the Ipswichian glaciation by an ancient precursor to the River Colne. From these deposits beneath the town have been found Palaeolithic flint tools, including at least six Acheulian handaxes. Further flint tools made by hunter gatherers living in the Colne Valley during the Mesolithic have been discovered, including a tranchet axe from Middlewick. In the 1980s an archaeological inventory showed that over 800 shards of pottery from the Neolithic, Bronze Age and early Iron Age have been found within Colchester, along with many examples of worked flint. This included a pit found at Culver Street containing a ritually placed Neolithic grooved ware pot, as well as find spots containing later Deverel Rimbury bucket urns. Colchester is surrounded by Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments that pre date the town itself, these include a Neolithic henge at Tendring, large Bronze Age barrow cemeteries at Dedham and Langham, and a larger example at Brightlingsea consisting of a cluster of twenty two barrows.

Celtic origins of Colchester

Colchester is said to be the oldest recorded town in Britain on the grounds that it was mentioned by Pliny the Elder, who died in AD 79, although the Celtic name of the town, Camulodunon appears on coins minted by tribal chieftain Tasciovanus in the period 20 - 10 BC. Before the Roman conquest of Britain it was already a centre of power for Cunobelin, known to Shakespeare as Cymbeline, the king of the Catuvellauni, who minted coins there.

The Celtic name of Colchester, Camulodunon, variously represented as CA, CAM, CAMV, CAMVL and CAMVLODVNO on the coins of Cunobelinus, means the fortress of the war god Camulos. During the 30s AD Camulodunon controlled a large swathe of Southern and Eastern Britain, with Cunobelin called King of the Britons by Roman writers. Camulodunon is sometimes popularly considered one of many possible sites around Britain for the legendary Camelot of King Arthur, though the name Camelot is most likely a corruption of Camlann, a now unknown location first mentioned in the 10th century Welsh annalistic text Annales Cambriae, identified as the place where Arthur was slain in battle.

The Roman period in Colchester

Soon after the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, a Roman legionary fortress was established, this was to be the first in Britain. Later, when the Roman frontier moved outwards and the twentieth legion had moved to the west, Camulodunum became a colonia named in a second century inscription as Colonia Victricensis. This contained a large and elaborate Temple to the Divine Emperor Claudius, the largest classical style temple in Britain, as well as at least seven other Romano British temples.

Colchester is home to two of the five Roman theatres found in Britain; the example at Gosbecks is the largest in Britain and is able to seat five thousand.

Camulodunum served as a provincial Roman capital of Britain, but was attacked and destroyed during Boudicas rebellion in AD 61. Sometime after the destruction, London became the capital of the province of Britannia. Colchesters town walls were built, when the Roman town was rebuilt after the Boudicca rebellion. In 2004, Colchester Archaeological Trust discovered the remains of a Roman Circus, used for chariot races, underneath the Garrison in Colchester. The Roman town of Camulodunum, officially known as Colonia Victricensis, reached its peak in the Second and Third centuries AD. It may have reached a population of 30,000 during that period.

In 2014 a hoard of jewellery, known as The Fenwick Hoard, named for the shop it was found beneath, was discovered in Colchester town centre. The director of Colchester Archaeological Trust, described the hoard as being of national importance and one of the finest ever uncovered in Britain.

The medieval period in Colchester

Medieval Colchester still has its main landmark as Colchester Castle. Colchester castle is an 11th century Norman keep, and is built on top of the vaults of the old Roman temple. There are notable medieval ruins in Colchester, including the surviving gateway of the Benedictine abbey of St John the Baptist, and the ruins of the Augustinian priory of St Botolph. Many of Colchesters parish churches date from this period.

Colchesters medieval town seal has incorporated the biblical text Intravit ihc: in quoddam castellum et mulier quedam excepit illum. This translates to Jesus entered a certain castle and a woman there welcomed him. This is a commonplace allegory in which a castle is likened to Marys womb, and explains the name of Maidenburgh St, neighbouring the castle.

In 1189, Colchester was granted its first royal charter by King Richard I. who was probably better known as Richard the Lionheart. The charter was granted at Dover with the king about to embark on one of his many journeys away from England. The borough celebrated the 800th anniversary of its charter in 1989.

Colchester developed rapidly during the later 14th century as a centre of the woollen cloth industry, and became famous in many parts of Europe for its russets, these are fabrics of a grey and brown colour. This allowed the population to recover rapidly from the effects of the Black Death, particularly by immigration into the town. Rovers Tye Farm, now a pub on Ipswich Road, has been documented as being established by 1353.

Colchester in Tudor times

By 1372, a borough council was instituted; the two bailiffs who represented the borough to the king were now expected to consult sixteen ordinary councillors and eight auditors, who were later called aldermen. Even though Colchesters fortunes were more mixed during the 15th century, it was still a more important place by the 16th century than it had been in the 13th. In 1334 it would not have ranked among Englands wealthiest fifty towns, to judge from the taxation levied that year. By 1524, however, it ranked twelfth, as measured by its assessment to a lay subsidy.

Between 1550 and 1600, a large number of weavers and clothmakers from Flanders, the Dutch speaking northern portion of Belgium emigrated to Colchester and the surrounding areas. They were famed for the production of Bays and Says cloths which were woven from wool and are normally associated with Baize and Serge although surviving examples show that they were rather different from their modern equivalents. An area in town centre is still known as the Dutch Quarter and many buildings there date from the Tudor period. During this period Colchester was one of the most prosperous wool towns in England, and was also famed for its oysters.

Flemish refugees in the 1560s brought innovations that revived the local cloth trade, establishing the Dutch Bay Hall for quality control of the textiles for which Colchester became famous. The old Roman wall runs along Northgate Street in the Dutch Quarter.

During the reign of Queen Mary 1st, she earned the name of Bloody Mary, when Colchester became a centre of Protestant heresy and in consequence at least nineteen of the local Colchester people were burned at the stake at the Castle, at first in front, later within the walls. They are commemorated on a tablet near the altar of St Peters Church. Mary was desperate to bring Catholicism back as the prominent religion in Britain after her father King Henry had broken away from the Catholic faith over the refusal of the pope to grant a divorce from Catherine of Aragon, Marys mother. Henry wanted to be free to marry his mistress, Anne Boleyn. When Mary died, her younger half sister Elizabeth took the throne and ended the persecution of the protestants.

Splashbacks of Distinction have been producing and fitting the very finest quality toughened glass splashbacks and other glass related products for a number of years and our reputation is second to none. A large percentage of our work is drawn from referrals from our very satisfied customers. The bulk of our work is in the area of kitchen and bathroom glass splashbacks, although many of our clients are now making enquiries about our other glass products as the splashbacks look and feel so good and are a doddle to keep clean.

Splashbacks of Distinction supply the following in Colchester:

  • Coloured or patterned kitchen splashbacks
  • Coloured or patterned glass bathroom splashbacks
  • Toughened glass balustrades
  • Toughened glass shelves
  • Custom made mirrors
  • Bespoke shower screens and enclosures
  • Kitchen splashbacks with a high resolution image
  • Glass bathroom splashbacks, also with or without high resolution images
  • Toughened glass Juliet balconies

So if you live in Colchester and would like Splashbacks of Distinction to provide you with a high quality glass splashback or any other glass product in our range, why not give us a call or fill in our contact form. We are a family run business and have a long list of very satisfied customers. Why not check out our projects gallery page to see some of our work.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01920 830 084, email us at enquiries@splashbacksofdistinction.co.uk or fill in our enquiry form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Areas covered in Essex:

Showroom: Unit 11, Broomhall Farm, Watton At Stone, Hertford SG14 2RN

t: 01920 830 084

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