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Kitchen splashback glitter finish
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Glass Splashbacks | Kitchen Splashbacks | Bathroom Splashbacks | Glass Balustrades | Peckham, London

Based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, Splashbacks of Distinction have a real passion for toughened glass in and around the home. We have transformed many properties, both commercial and domestic with our glass splashbacks, for kitchens, bathrooms and living rooms. Our toughened glass balustrades, glass shelving and splashbacks with high resolution images have really caught the imagination of people who demand beauty and functionality in their homes and offices.

Glass splashbacks in Peckham

Splashbacks of Distinction are a family run, professional business that is based in Stevenage, Hertfordshire. We cover a wide area, supplying and fitting many different types of glass products and offer many premium glass related services.

Splashbacks of Distinction are happy to visit your Peckham property to discuss any glass project you may have. We can help with advice, supply and fitting of your new glass splashback or other glass products.

A little about Peckham

Peckham is a Saxon place name meaning the village of the River Peck, a small stream that ran through the district until it was enclosed in 1823. Archaeological evidence indicates earlier Roman occupation in the area, although the name of this settlement is lost.

Peckham appears in the Domesday Book as Pecheham. It was held by the Bishop of Lisieux from Odo of Bayeux.

The manor was owned by King Henry I, who gave it to his son Robert, Earl of Gloucester. When Robert married the heiress to Camberwell the two manors were united under royal ownership. King John probably hunted at Peckham and local anecdotes suggest that the right to an annual fair was granted to celebrate a particularly good days sport. The fair grew to be a major event lasting up to three weeks until its abolition in 1827.

Peckham became popular as a wealthy residential area by the 16th century and there are several claims that Christopher Wren had local links. By the 18th century the area was a more commercial centre and attracted industrialists who wanted to avoid paying the expensive rents in central London. Peckham also boasted extensive market gardens and orchards growing produce for the nearby markets of London. Local produce included melons, figs and grapes. The manor house was sacked in 1688, as its then owner Sir Henry Bond was a Roman Catholic and staunch supporter of James II. The house was finally demolished in 1797 for the formation of Peckham Hill Street.

The village was the last stopping point for many cattle drovers taking their livestock for sale in London. The drovers stayed in the local inns while the cattle were safely secured overnight in holding pens. Most of the villagers were agricultural or horticultural workers but with the early growth of the suburbs an increasing number worked in the brick industry that exploited the local London Clay.

In 1767 William Blake visited Peckham Rye and had a vision of an angel in a tree. In 1993, at the request of the Dulwich Festival, artist Stan Peskett painted a mural of Blake's vision next to the Goose Green playground in East Dulwich.

The Nineteenth Century in Peckham

At the beginning of the 19th century, Peckham was synonymous with Peckham Rye: a "small, quiet, retired village surrounded by fields". Since 1744 stagecoaches had travelled with an armed guard between Peckham and London to give protection from the much feared highwaymen who stalked the highways and byways at that time. The rough roads constrained traffic so a branch of the Grand Surrey Canal was proposed as a route from the Thames to Portsmouth. The canal was built from Surrey Commercial Docks to Peckham before the builders ran out of funds in 1826. The abbreviated canal was used to ship soft wood for construction and even though the canal was drained and backfilled in 1970, Whitten's timber merchants stood on the site known as Eagle Wharf until it closed in 2019 and the location was designated for development.

In 1851 Thomas Tilling started an omnibus service from Peckham to London. Tilling's buses were the first to use pre-arranged bus stops, which helped them to run to a reliable timetable. His services expanded to cover much of London. All was going well for this new and reliable form of public transport until the outbreak of the First World War, which saw his horses requisitioned by the Army to serve on the front.

During the mid-19th century, housing had spread north and west of Peckham Rye. The area in the north, towards Old Kent Road, on land previously owned by the Hill family, from whom the name Peckham Hill Street was derived, was initially known as Peckham New Town, although it would later become synonymous with Peckham in general. In the area west of Peckham Rye Common and Peckham Rye Park, many large houses were built in an attempt to attract a wealthier population to the Peckham area.

Peckham gets a railway station

Peckham Rye railway station was opened, in 1865. With the arrival of the railway and the introduction of horse-drawn trams about ten years later, Peckham became accessible to artisans and clerical staff working in the city and the docks. Housing for this new group of people filled almost all the remaining fields except the Rye. In 1868 the vestry of Camberwell St Giles bought the Rye to keep it as common land, as it feared it too would be swallowed up by the construction of new homes and businesses. Responding to concerns about the dangerous overcrowding of the common on holidays the vestry bought the adjacent Homestall Farm, which was the last farm in the Peckham area in 1894 and opened this as Peckham Rye Park.

With the sudden influx of younger residents who had disposable income to spend, Rye Lane became a major shopping street. Jones & Higgins opened a small shop in 1867 on the corner of Rye Lane and Peckham High Street that became the best known department store in south London for many years. It closed in the 1980s. In 1870 George Gibson Bussey moved to Peckham and set up a firm described as "Firearms, Ammunition & Shooting" at the Museum Works, Rye Lane, Peckham. The Museum of Firearms was built in 1867. The Ordnance Survey Map of 1868 shows the museum building with a rifle range at the rear extending along the side of the railway embankment for a considerable distance.

Tomato ketchup and Peckham

The late 19th century also saw the arrival of George Batty, a manufacturer of condiments, whose main business stood at Finsbury Pavement. The company's Peckham premises occupied nineteen railway arches. It was acquired by the H. J. Heinz Company in 1905 as their first UK manufacturing base.

The southern end of Peckham was the location for the railway line that once served the Crystal Palace in Sydenham. Though the line was eventually dismantled due to the collapse of the embankment into the gardens of Marmora Road it is still possible to see large sections of it. The flats on Wood Vale and the full length of Brenchley Gardens trace its route.

A ground breaking reservoir for Peckham

Close by is the Aquarius Golf Club, which is located over the cavernous Honor Oak Reservoir, constructed between 1901 and 1909. When it was completed it was the largest brick built underground reservoir in the world and is still one of the largest in Europe. The reservoir now forms part of the Southern extension of the Thames Water Ring Main.

Camberwell Old Cemetery, on Forest Hill Road, is a later example of the ring of Victorian cemeteries that were built to alleviate the overcrowding of churchyards that was experienced with the rapid expansion of London in the 19th century. The Stone House at its main entrance was used as a film location for Entertaining Mr. Sloane in 1970, an adaptation from the Joe Orton play. It was gutted by fire in the mid-1970s and rebuilt a few years later. Camberwell Old Cemetery did not have the grandeur of nearby Nunhead Cemetery, which was one of the original London necropolis, and once nearing capacity it was replaced by Camberwell New Cemetery on Brenchley Gardens.

Brenchley Gardens Park follows the route of the old line to the Crystal Palace culminating at the High Level station. The park runs behind Marmora Road and the remains of the embankment then continues along Wood Vale where flats were built on it. The line was closed in 1954 following a decline in its use after the destruction of the Crystal Palace in 1936 and due to slippage in the structure of the embankment.

The Twentieth Century in Peckham

In the 1930s George Scott Williamson and Innes Pearse opened the Pioneer Health Centre in Queens Road, Peckham. They planned to conduct a large experiment into the effect of environment on health. 'The Peckham Experiment' recruited nearly a thousand families who paid one shilling a week for access to something like a modern sports club with facilities for physical exercise, games, workshops and socialising with no mandatory programme. The centre moved into a purpose built modernist building by the architect Sir Owen Williams in 1935.

North Peckham was heavily redeveloped in the 1960s, consisting mainly of high-rise flats to house people who had originally lived in dilapidated old houses. It was popular on its completion for offering a high quality and modern standard of living. However, high unemployment and a lack of economic opportunities led to urban decay and a period of decline in the late 1970s. The North Peckham Estate became one of the most deprived residential areas in Western Europe. Vandalism, graffiti, arson attacks, burglaries, robberies and muggings were all commonplace, and the area became an archetypal London sink estate. As a result, the area was subjected to a £290 million regeneration programme in the late 1990s and early 2000s. After the beginning of the regeneration, the estate gained nationwide notoriety in the media when 10-year-old Nigerian resident Damilola Taylor was stabbed to death on the estate on 27 November 2000. A gang operating in the area is the Peckham Boys.

In the early 1990s Peckham was a centre of underground music partly due to a large squat known as The Dolehouse in a disused, two-floor DHSS building near Peckham High Street. The building was already known for having featured in the cover shot of a 1980s pictorial biography of 1960s' mods, featuring them on their customised scooters outside the then Camberwell Labour Exchange. In 1989 the squatters adopted the name Dole House Crew and along with another local group of squatters called the "Green Circus", held regular gigs in the building. They moved on to many other South East London venues after the Peckham Dolehouse was evicted in late October 1990. A squatted social centre called the Spike Surplus Scheme ran from 1998 until being evicted by the council in 2009.

Peckham was again brought to the attentions of people as the home to Del Boy and Rodney in Only Fools and Horses. They lived in one of the high rise flat complexes and where famous for their wheeling, dealing and shady business practices.

Today in Peckham

Since the 1990s the European Union has invested in the regeneration of Peckham; partly funding the award-winning Peckham Library, a new town square and new housing to replace the North Peckham Estate. State funding is being provided to improve the housing stock and renovate the streets. This includes funding for public arts projects like the Tom Phillips mosaics on the wall of the Peckham Experiment restaurant.

1994 saw the completion of the Peckham Arch designed by architects Troughton McAslan and funded in part by a £1m Single Regeneration Budget grant. The arch is due to be demolished to make way for nineteen flats; the decision was made despite many high profile public protests.

The main shopping street is Rye Lane and the large Peckham Rye Park is nearby. Bellenden Road is an area of small independent shops.

Peckham remains culturally diverse

The area known as Peckham covers a large area of south London and takes in many diverse communities. The British Nigerian community forms a sizeable component of the population of the area, with the area being dubbed "Little Lagos" as a result. As of 2011, the whole Peckham area had a Nigerian-born population of 5,250 people. A traditional London working class community now coexists with communities that have their origins in the Caribbean, China, India, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Somalia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Turkey, Eastern Europe and Vietnam. As well as these communities there has been a steady gentrification of some of the areas in the south of Peckham and this has meant an influx of cafes, wine bars, niche shops and artists' studios.

Splashbacks of Distinction supply the following splashback products in Peckham, London

  • Glass kitchen splashbacks
  • Glass kitchen splashback samples
  • Glass kitchen splashbacks in many different colours
  • Printed glass splashbacks
  • Colour matched splashbacks
  • Painted splashbacks

Splashbacks of Distinction also supply the following glass products in Peckham, London

  • Stainless steel and glass Balustrades
  • Glass shelves
  • Coloured mirrors
  • Toughened mirrors
  • Decorative glass
  • Glass hardware
  • Glass worktops
  • Glass shower cubicle
  • Garden glass balustrades
  • Glass staircases
  • Glass table tops
  • Satin glass
  • Toughened glass
  • Laminated glass
  • Opaque glass

Splashbacks of Distinction also supply the following glass related services in Peckham, London

  • Glass cut to size
  • Mirrors cut to size while you wait
  • Glass processing
  • Glass supply and installation
  • Supply only splashbacks
  • A glass express service
  • Template and fit

Only the finest quality from Splashbacks of Distinction

Splashbacks of Distinction ensure that only the finest quality toughened glass is used in all our products. We guarantee all of our work and are fully insured. We employ only trained and certified engineers. Splashbacks of Distinction never leave your property without ensuring you are totally satisfied with your beautiful new glass splashback, baluster, shelving or shower enclosure.

Further Information

If you would like to know more or are interested in a quote we would be happy to help. Phone us on 01920 830 084, email us at enquiries@splashbacksofdistinction.co.uk or fill in our enquiry form and we will be in touch as soon as possible.

Areas covered in London:

Showroom: Unit 11, Broomhall Farm, Watton At Stone, Hertford SG14 2RN

t: 01920 830 084

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